Finland Economy

Work abroad sounds like an adventure to many people. However, job search in Finland requires more than just the obvious Finland cover letter and Finland CV writing and translation - it requires thorough preparation. You will experience problems that probably did not even come to your mind when you decided to get an employment in Finland.

Do not take too lightly the influence a work in Finland can have on the effect of your adventure! For instance, you will experience the different immigration rules and practices, strange job application procedures, unfamiliar job candidate selection criteria and out of the ordinary management culture.

Most visits to Finland are trouble-free but you should be aware of the risk of indiscriminate terrorist attacks, which could be against civilian targets, including places frequented by expatriates and foreign travelers like restaurants, hotels, clubs and shopping areas. In recent years, the Finnish authorities have carried out a number of investigations and operations against terrorist networks.
You should exercise a high level of security awareness and monitor local news broadcasts and consular messages. Making local contacts quickly and seeking support from other expatriates will greatly increase your comfort and safety

Finland economy - overview: Finland has a highly industrialized and largely free-market economy with per capita output roughly that of the UK, France, Germany, and Italy. Its key economic sector is manufacturing - principally the wood, metals, engineering, telecommunications and electronics industries.

Trade is important; exports equal nearly two-fifths of GDP. Finland excels in high-tech exports, e.g., mobile phones. Except for timber and several minerals, Finland depends on imports of raw materials, energy, and some components for manufactured goods. Because of the climate, agricultural development is limited to maintaining self-sufficiency in basic products. Forestry, an important export earner, provides a secondary occupation for the rural population.

Finland had been one of the best performing economies within the EU in recent years and its banks and financial markets avoided the worst of global financial crisis. However, the world slowdown hit exports and domestic demand hard in 2009, with Finland experiencing one of the deepest contractions in the euro zone.

A recovery of exports, domestic trade, and household consumption stimulated economic growth in 2010. The recession left a deep mark on general government finances and the debt ratio, turning previously strong budget surpluses into deficits. In addition to marginal growth prospects, general government finances will remain in deficit during the next few years.

The great challenge of economic policy will be to mitigate a possible recession in 2012 in which measures supporting growth will be combined with general government adjustment measures. Longer-term, Finland must address a rapidly aging population and decreasing productivity that threaten competitiveness, fiscal sustainability, and economic growth.

Labor force - by occupation: agriculture and forestry 4.4%, industry 18.6%, construction 6%, commerce 16.3%, finance, insurance, and business services 13.9%, transport and communications 7.6%, public services 33.2% (2004)

Unemployment rate: 6.9% (2007 est.), 7.8% (2011 est.)

Natural resources: timber, copper, zinc, iron ore, silver

Industries: metal products, electronics, shipbuilding, pulp and paper, copper refining, foodstuffs, chemicals, textiles, clothing

euro banknotesCurrency: Euro (EUR; symbol €) = 100 cents. Notes are in denominations of €500, 200, 100, 50, 20, 10 and 5. Coins are in denominations of €2 and 1, and 50, 20, 10 and 5 cents. Note that 1 and 2 cent coins, while valid in other Euro-zone countries, are not used in Finland.

Credit/Debit Cards and ATMs: All major credit and debit cards are widely accepted. ATMs are widely available.

Traveler’s Cheques: Traveler’s cheques can be exchanged at banks or exchange offices (at a lower commission), and can be used to pay for goods in some tourist-oriented shops. Travelers are advised to take traveler’s cheques in Euros, Pounds Sterling or US Dollars.

Exchange rates: Euros (EUR) per US dollar - 0.7107 (2011 est.), 0.755 (2010 est.), 0.7198 (2009 est.), 0.6827 (2008 est.), 0.7345 (2007 est.), 0.7964 (2006), 0.8041 (2005), 0.8054 (2004), 0.886 (2003), 1.06 (2002), 1.12 (2001), 1.09 (2000), 0.94 (1999)

Inflation rate (consumer prices): 2.5% (2007 est.), 3.4% (2011 est.)

Other Finland Economy Info

To be successful in your Finland job search and getting jobs you want, you need prepare Finland cover letter and Finland CV which you must email instantly to the prospective employers selected during job search in Finland.

When you receive an invitation to the Finland job interview, you may apply for the Finland visa and Finland work permit. Then prepare yourself for Finland job interview and take a look at Finland dress code because how you dress is the one of the most important attribute in being hired.

Check the job interview do's & don'ts, job interview tips and other job search skills pages. Find out why people are not hired for available jobs.

In addition, on the international info, job search, visa, work permit, cover letter, CV & resume, job interview and dress code pages you will find many useful tips for overseas job seekers.

Good luck with the Finland economy info!